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FactoryStandard

Bike Chain Gauge

by FactoryStandard Feb 13, 2017
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Great design! I am investigating some chain issues on my MTB and have a question in my mind. Can a typical FDM 3D printer achieve the accuracy a chain gauge required? 6 links = 6 inches = 152.4mm. To make the 0% and .5% mark meaningful, the .5% (if we count on metric) mark should be at (152.4mm - 7.5mm + 0.762mm) +/- 0.381mm. Min-Max tolerance is about/less-than 2 filament line width in a .4mm nozzle setup. On top of that, materials cool down from 200+ degree can give over 1% shrinkage. And this shrinkage is material/nozzle/bed temperature/humidity dependent. Let alone step motor accuracy, filament tolerance, axis-orthogonality(mbot, hbot, corexy, prusa)/motor-consistency(corexy, delta)/numerical-accuracy(delta) challenged by the curvy design at both measurement ends of this gauge.

May I suggest including a calibration gauge in the file package? Perhaps as simple as a 16cm long strip that user can print for a serious measure using a ruler at room temperature. Adjust the print scale accordingly right before printing the gauge in the same material, print-setting and print-orientation.

Finally, thank you for the contribution. Please kindly point out if I've got anything wrong.

Nice design, I'm going to print one out and compare it to my Park CC-3.2. One concern I have is printer variance - I know mine isn't exactly the most accurate based on measurements I've taken - might it be good to have some reference dimension on the tool - like a 100mm space that could be checked with calipers to verify? If the tool is only off by a little bit, it would render its accuracy as a chain wear gauge completely useless.

Will post a print when mine is done with my findings.

Nice idea. Saves me time from designing my own version.
But you surely mean 5 ‰ or 0.5 %. Before you reach 5 % your chain will fall apart ­– and slip a lot before that.
The problem is once more the American non-system of measurements.
Who can say how many percent 12 1/16 ″ is longer than 12 ″. Even with those numbers 32 cm vs 30.63 cm vs. 30.48 cm is clearer.

Who can say how many percent 12 1/16 ″ is longer than 12 ″

Anyone with a calculator, last time I checked.

It looks and prints really nice.